Centre for Forensic Behavioural Science

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Cultural awareness training for health professionals can have unintended consequences

Abstract not available.

Author: Shepherd, Stephane M.
Publication year: 2018
Publication type: Commentary
Status: Live|Last updated:January 23, 2018 11:32 AM
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A comparison of psychopathology and reoffending in female and male convicted firesetters

Little is known about the psychopathological or criminal history characteristics of female firesetters, or how often women reoffend by firesetting. The current study is one of the few large-scale longitudinal investigations to compare key psychiatric and offending variables in female and male firesetters who are not incarcerated or known to be mentally disordered. In addition, the study aimed to identify the base rate of recidivism for female firesetters compared with males. The study compared all 143 female and 909 male firesetters convicted of arson and fire-related offenses between 2000 and 2009 in Victoria, Australia. The study employed a data linkage approach to compare the psychiatric and criminal histories of participants and reoffending in the sample. Firesetters of both sexes reoffended by firesetting at similar rates (males 5.1%, females 7.0%), and reoffenders shared many characteristics. Compared with male firesetters, female firesetters were found to be less criminally versatile, to have offended …

Author: Ducat, Lauren, McEwan, Troy, Ogloff, James R. P.
Publication year: 2017
Publication type: Journal article
Status: Live|Last updated:January 16, 2018 5:14 PM
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Responding to the mental health needs of women offenders

Female inmates are among the most marginalised groups in society … The prevalence of childhood and adulthood sexual and violent victimisation, poverty, and poor educational and employment attainment reported by female inmates is nothing short of alarming (Nicholls, Lee, Corrado and Ogloff, 2004:179)

Author: Ogloff, Jim, Tye, Christine
Publication year: 2013
Publication type: Book chapter
Status: Live|Last updated:December 21, 2017 2:32 PM
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Understanding the personality disorder and aggression relationship: an investigation using contemporary aggression theory

Research has consistently demonstrated a link between certain personality disorders (PDs) and increased rates of aggression and violence. At present, understanding of the mechanisms that underlie this relationship is limited. This study was designed to examine the contention (Gilbert & Daffern, 2011) that the application of a contemporary psychological aggression theory, the General Aggression Model (GAM; Anderson & Bushman, 2002), may assist in elucidating the PD-aggression relationship. Eighty-seven offenders undergoing presentence evaluation were assessed for Axis II PDs and psychopathy, aggression, and three constructs delineated by the GAM: scripts, normative beliefs, and anger. Regression analyses were undertaken to examine the relative contributions of these variables to aggression. The results upheld a relationship between several PDs and aggression, and suggested that for these PDs, the consideration of scripts, beliefs supportive of aggression, and anger facilitated an improved understanding of aggr…

Author: Gilbert, Flora, Daffern, Michael, Talevski, Diana, Ogloff, James R. P.
Publication year: 2015
Publication type: Journal article
Status: Live|Last updated:December 21, 2017 2:21 PM
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Institutional aggression as a predictor of violent recidivism: Implications for parole decision making

Assessing risk for future violence in incarcerated offenders is a complex task, one which members of parole boards routinely undertake when they consider the suitability of an offender for release. Among the factors shown to influence parole board decision making is institutional aggression. However, several factors complicate the use of institutional aggression as a proxy for violent behavior following release. This includes environmental influences that may promote or suppress aggression during incarceration, and the process of adaptation to imprisonment that is characteristic of those who are imprisoned for extended periods. Furthermore, the extant research exploring the link between institutional aggression and post-release recidivism has produced varied results. This literature review examines the factors shown to impact on parole release decisions, how the decision-making process has evolved over time, and the use of violence risk assessment approaches to this task. The link between aggressive behavior …

Author: Mooney, Jessica L., Daffern, Michael
Publication year: 2011
Publication type: Journal article
Status: Live|Last updated:December 21, 2017 1:44 PM
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Understanding protective factors for violent reoffending in adults

Although there has been long-standing interest in identifying those factors that have the potential to increase the likelihood of violence, it is only relatively recently that attention has been given to those factors that act in the opposite way, or what are commonly referred to as protective factors. This paper considers the meaning of the term protective factor and how this and similarly termed constructs have been conceptualized and operationalized in violent offender assessment instruments. We discuss the relationship between risk and protective factors and identify a number of conceptual and definitional issues that arise. Finally, we consider the measurement of protective factors as they pertain to their inclusion in contemporary violent offender assessment instruments.

Author: Klepfisz, Gabrielle, Daffern, Michael, Day, Andrew
Publication year: 2017
Publication type: Journal article
Status: Live|Last updated:December 21, 2017 1:36 PM
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Perceptions of procedural justice and coercion during community-based mental health crisis: A comparison study among stand-alone police response and co-responding police and mental health clinician response

The interaction of police officers with people experiencing community-based mental health crisis has involved the use of first responder police responses and/or co-responding approaches with mental health clinicians. Despite favourable outcomes, the consumer experience remains largely unknown. The aim of this study was to profile perceptions about the Northern Police and Clinician Response (NPACER) when the unit responded to mental health crisis compared with perceptions of a police only response. A total of 43 participants were recruited from an acute adult inpatient mental health unit and completed the Police Contact Experience Scale that quantifies perceptions of procedural justice and coercion. The major finding was that the NPACER model enabled greater perceptions of procedural justice and comparable perceptions of coercion. Although the NPACER facilitated clinical advantages, the nature of involuntary hospitalization may explain similar perceptions of coercion among the NPACER and a police officer only …

Author: Furness, Trentham, Maguire, Tessa, Brown, Steve, McKenna, Brian
Publication year: 2016
Publication type: Journal article
Status: Live|Last updated:December 14, 2017 4:32 PM
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Are multiple-trial experiments appropriate for eyewitness identification studies? Accuracy, choosing, and confidence across trials

Eyewitness identification experiments typically involve a single trial: a participant views an event and subsequently makes a lineup decision. Compared to this single-trial paradigm, multiple-trial designs are more efficient but significantly reduce ecological validity and may affect the strategies participants use to make lineup decisions. We examined the effects of a number of forensically-relevant variables (i.e., memory strength, type of disguise, degree of disguise, and lineup type) on eyewitness accuracy, choosing, and confidence across 12 target-present and 12 target-absent lineup trials (N = 349; 8,376 lineup decisions). Rates of correct rejections and choosing (across both target-present and -absent lineups) did not vary across the 24 trials as reflected by main effects or interactions with trial number. Trial number had a significant but trivial quadratic effect on correct identifications (OR = 0.99) and interacted significantly, but again trivially, with disguise type (OR = 1.00). Trial number did …

Author: Mansour, Jamal K., Beaudry, Jennifer L., Lindsay, R. C. L.
Publication year: 2017
Publication type: Journal article
Status: Live|Last updated:December 11, 2017 12:37 PM
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Personality disorders by numbers (Correspondence/Commentary)

Abstract not available.

Author: Mullen, Paul E.
Publication year: 2017
Publication type: Journal article
Status: Live|Last updated:November 23, 2017 1:32 PM
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Assessing the mental health, substance abuse, cognitive functioning, and social/emotional well-being needs of Aboriginal prisoners in Australia

This study sought to identify the incidence of mental illness, substance misuse, and cognitive impairment among a representative cohort of 123 Aboriginal people in custody in Australia. In addition, the study measured levels of social and emotional well-being (SEWB) and considered the interrelationship of mental health issues, SEWB, and unmet needs. Both male and femaleAboriginal prisoners were found to have high rates of mental health, substance abuse, and cognitive functioning needs that were heavily contextualized within perceptions of their own SEWB. Findings provide important information with regard to the specific needs of Aboriginal people in custody. Implications for the development and implementation of effective, culturally themed best practice programming for this population are discussed.

Author: Ogloff, James R. P., Pfeifer, Jeffrey E., Shepherd, Stephane M., Ciorc...
Publication year: 2017
Publication type: Journal article
Status: Live|Last updated:November 13, 2017 4:40 PM
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