Centre for Forensic Behavioural Science


Publications - Centre for Forensic Behavioural Science

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Showing: Beaudry, Jennifer; Daffern, Michael; Davis, Michael; De Bortoli, Lillian; Ducat, Lauren; Fullam, Rachael; Luebbers, Stefan; McEwan, Troy; Nixon, Margaret; Ogloff, James; Pfeifer, Jeffrey; Quinn, Chris; Shea, Daniel; Shepherd, Stephane; Shinkfield, Gregg; Sivasubramaniam, Diane; Skues, Jason; Strand, Susanne; Sullivan, Danny; Thomson, Kylie; Trounson, Justin; Warren, Lisa

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Showing 1 to 10 of 679 results

Cultural awareness workshops: limitations and practical consequences

Cultural awareness training for health professionals is now commonplace across a variety of sectors. Its popularity has spawned several alternatives (i.e., cultural competence, cultural safety, cultural humility, cultural intelligence) and overlapping derivatives (diversity training, anti-racism training, micro-aggression training). The ever-increasing reach of cultural awareness initiatives in health settings has generally been well intentioned - to improve cross-cultural clinical encounters and patient outcomes with the broader expectation of reducing health disparities. Yet the capacity of cultural awareness training to accomplish or even impact such outcomes is seldom comprehensively scrutinized. In response, this paper applies a much needed critical lens to cultural awareness training and its derivatives by examining their underpinning philosophies, assumptions and most importantly, verification of their effectiveness. The paper finds cultural awareness approaches to be over-generalizing, simplistic and …

Author: Shepherd, Stephane M.
Publication year: 2019
Publication type: Journal article
Source: BMC Medical Education
Status: Live|Last updated:9 January 2019 3:32 PM
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Risk factors for intimate partner violence: a comparison of antisocial and family-only perpetrators

Subtyping male perpetrators of intimate partner violence (IPV) based on their generality of violence could facilitate the difficult task of matching perpetrator subtype with efficient risk management strategies. As such, the aim of the present study was to compare antisocial and family-only male perpetrators of interpersonal violence in terms of (a) demographic and legal characteristics, (b) risk factors for violence, and (c) assessed risk and the importance of specific risk factors for violence. A quantitative design was used in this retrospective register study on data obtained from the Swedish police. Risk assessments performed with the Swedish version of the Brief Spousal Assault Form for the Evaluation of Risk (B-SAFER) and police registers were used. A sample of 657 male alleged IPV perpetrators were classified as antisocial (n = 341) or family-only (n = 316) based on their generality of violence. The results showed that the antisocial perpetrators were significantly younger, as well as more psychologic…

Author: Petersson, Joakim, Strand, Susanne, Selenius, Heidi
Publication year: 2016
Publication type: Journal article
Source: Journal of Interpersonal Violence
Status: Live|Last updated:4 January 2019 11:32 AM
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The role of psychopathy in stalking

Abstract not available.

Author: Ogloff, J. R. P., Veal, R. G., Shea, D., McEwan, T.
Publication year: 2018
Publication type: Book chapter (In press)
Source: The international handbook of psychopathic disorders and the law / Henning Sass and Allan R. Feltous (eds.)
Status: Live|Last updated:19 December 2018 12:36 PM
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The background and clinical use of the Dynamic Appraisal of Situational Aggression – Inpatient Version (DASA-IV): Application to a secure setting

Violence risk assessment in mental health inpatient settings serves to identify factors that indicate an elevation in violence propensity within individuals,' thereby encouraging the enactment of appropriately targeted interventions to mitigate risk. Violence risk assessment within inpatient mental health settings also aids the identification of patients who are not violence-prone (i.e., low-risk), which should encourage staff to reduce the restrictions placed upon the individuals at a time when their liberty is already constrained. The Dynamic Appraisal of Situational Aggression (DASA, Ogloff, and Daffern, 2006) is a seven-item actuarial risk assessment instrument designed to assist in the assessment of violence risk. DASA is now widely used and endorsed by the National Institute for Clinical Excellence (NICE, 2015) in the UK for assessing and managing risk of violence within inpatient settings. This chapter describes the development and use of DASA, using a case study to illustrate its application.

Author: Thorpe, Mark W., Xavier, Panchu F., Daffern, Michael, Dunne, Ashley L.
Publication year: 2019
Publication type: Book chapter
Source: Violent and Sexual Offenders: Assessment, Treatment and Management, 2nd Edition / Jane L. Ireland, Carol A. Ireland, Philip Birch (eds.)
Status: Live|Last updated:19 December 2018 11:19 AM
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Pathways to offending for young Sudanese Australians

Many Sudanese Australians have faced re-settlement challenges since migrating to Australia from the late 1990s onwards. Challenges have included language barriers, obtaining stable housing, acquiring employment, acculturative stressors and discrimination. Moreover, many have been exposed to pre-migratory traumas and family fragmentation. Despite these difficulties, the vast majority of Sudanese Australians have integrated successfully into the fabric of Australian society. Yet a small number of young Sudanese Australians are at-risk for violence and other criminal activities, resulting in their over-representation in the criminal justice system. These circumstances have been the subject of sustained sensationalised media coverage in Australia. However, little academic attention has been afforded to these matters. This study aimed to address this gap in the literature by identifying the self-reported life experiences and offending patterns of Sudanese-Australian youth in custody. Findings illuminated a number …

Author: Shepherd, Stephane M., Newton, Danielle, Farquharson, Karen
Publication year: 2018
Publication type: Journal article
Source: Australian & New Zealand Journal of Criminology
Status: Live|Last updated:18 December 2018 11:43 AM
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The science behind Bayley V The Queen

Eyewitness identification was the principal evidence in DPP v Bayley (2015), in which Adrian Bayley received a jail sentence for the rape and assault of a woman that took place in 2000. Twelve years after the attack, the victim identified Bayley from a photograph seen on Facebook and later in a formal police identification procedure. At the time of the initial Facebook identification the victim knew about Bayley’s involvement in Gillian Meagher’s case. Bayley successfully appealed this conviction in 2016. The Court of Appeal held that the identification evidence in this case had multiple weaknesses and should not have been permitted at the initial trial. In the decision, the Court relied on legal precedents to support their judgement. In this article we review the empirical evidence regarding each of the issues raised by the Court. In addition, we review how the stressfulness of an event can influence the reliability of an identification, and explore why the jury may have rendered a guilty verdict based on th…

Author: Skalon, Alena, Beaudry, Jennifer L.
Publication year: 2018
Publication type: Journal article (In press)
Source: Psychiatry, Psychology and Law
Status: Live|Last updated:18 December 2018 11:32 AM
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'They will find another way to hurt you': Emerging adults’ perceptions of coping with cyberbullying

To date, there is a limited amount of research exploring how emerging adults cope with cyberbullying despite being prolific users of technology. The aim of this qualitative study was to explore emerging adults’ views, opinions, and perceptions of how individuals within this developmental period cope with being targeted by cyberbullying behaviors. Six focus groups were conducted with 39 participants (64% female) between 18 and 25 years of age in Melbourne, Australia. Thematic analysis of the data identified several coping strategies that can be employed in response to cyberbullying, which were categorized as problem-focused coping, emotion-focused coping, or cyber-specific technological solutions. In addition to these ways of coping, two notable findings provide insight into the complex and dynamic pattern of perceptions of control and coping style selection and the perceived effectiveness of such coping strategies. This study has implications for targets of cyberbullying, research, and practice.

Author: Alipan, Alexandra, Skues, Jason L., Theiler, Stephen
Publication year: 2018
Publication type: Journal article (In press)
Source: Emerging Adulthood
Status: Live|Last updated:18 December 2018 11:32 AM
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The judge as cartographer and guide: the role of fact-based directions in improving juror comprehension

Recent decades have seen increasing concern as to the ability of jurors to understand and apply judicial directions in criminal trials. This has prompted reforms ranging from procedural changes to changes to the instructions themselves. While such modifications may improve juror comprehension and application, research indicates that the improvements are modest. The so-called "fact-based" approach to jury instructions incorporates many features that research suggests would improve juror comprehension and application. This article presents results from a large-scale study looking at whether fact-based directions can enhance comprehension and application of the law. The results provide some support for this approach as a means of improving comprehension and application. A particularly important finding was the extent to which group deliberation influences juror comprehension, and the use of fact-based directions may provide a framework to assist decision-making and encourage jurors to focus on the issues in disp…

Author: Clough, Jonathan, Spivak, Ben, Ogloff, James R. P., Tinsley, Yvette, Y...
Publication year: 2018
Publication type: Journal article
Source: Criminal Law Journal
Status: Live|Last updated:14 December 2018 11:32 AM
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Eyes wide open: Exploring men's and women's self-reported and physiological reactions to threat and crime

Objectives: In response to calls for physiological measurement of the fear of crime, we explored how men and women responded to self-report and physiological measures as they viewed threatening and/or crime-related images. Method: We used a Gender (men vs. women) x Threat (high vs. low) x Crime (high vs. low) mixed-factorial design. Participants (N = 40) viewed two blocks of 40 images from the Crime and Threat Image Set (CaTIS). In one block, participants rated their pleasantness and arousal (self-report) as they viewed the images. In the second block, we recorded participants’ eye blinks and Galvanic Skin Response (GSR; physiological) as they viewed the images. Participants also completed two traditional fear of crime measures. Results: On the traditional fear of crime measures, women reported significantly more fear of crime than men. When viewing images, there was a gender dynamic for self-reports of pleasantness: women reported feeling more unpleasant when viewing high-threat images than did men. Ratin…

Author: Noon, Michelle S., Beaudry, Jennifer L., Schier, Mark A., Knowles, Ann
Publication year: 2018
Publication type: Journal article (In press)
Source: Journal of Experimental Criminology
Status: Live|Last updated:6 December 2018 2:31 PM
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The role of aggression-related early maladaptive schemas and schema modes in aggression in a prisoner sample

Contemporary social-cognitive aggression theory and extant empirical research highlights the relationship between certain Early Maladaptive Schemas (EMSs) and aggression in offenders. To date, the related construct of schema modes, which presents a comprehensive and integrated schema unit, has received scant empirical attention. Furthermore, EMSs and schema modes have yet to be examined concurrently with respect to aggressive behavior. This study examined associations between EMSs, schema modes, and aggression in an offender sample. Two hundred and eight adult male prisoners completed self-report psychological tests measuring their histories of aggression, EMSs, and schema modes. Regression analyses revealed that EMSs were significantly associated with aggression but did not account for a unique portion of variance once the effects of schema modes were taken into account. Three schema modes, Enraged Child, Impulsive Child, and Bully and Attack, significantly predicted aggression. These findings support the pr…

Author: Dunne, Ashley L., Gilbert, Flora, Lee, Stuart, Daffern, Michael
Publication year: 2018
Publication type: Conference paper
Source: The Australian and New Zealand Association Of Psychiatry, Psychology And Law Annual Congress, Hobart, Australia, 21-24 November 2018.
Status: Live|Last updated:5 December 2018 3:19 PM
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