A content analysis of advertisements in the Chinese times, 1902-1914

Author(s)

Ch'ng, David

Available versions

Abstract

The Australian Chinese community of the early 1900s has been described as a 'closed' community, isolated from the mainstream Australian society and self-sufficient. The Chinese men were seen as largely idle, lacking the means for respectable recreation. This study investigated the dual role of the Victorian Chinese community during 1902-1914, firstly as a business entity and secondly, as a consumer market segment. The findings offer a new challenge to the earlier notions of the Chinese community, particularly with respect to its 'closeness' and ostracism from the rest of the Australian society, It also highlights some aspects of the interactions between European and Chinese business communities in Victoria.

Publication year

1991

Publication type

Working paper

Source

Faculty of Business staff papers, no. 76

Publisher

Swinburne Institute of Technology

ISBN

9780855906832

Copyright

Copyright © 1991 David Ch'ng. This work is reproduced in good faith. Every reasonable effort has been made to trace the copyright owner. For more information please contact <a href='mailto:researchbank@swin.edu.au'>researchbank@swin.edu.au</a>.

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